Wishing You Well

Archive for September 16th, 2013

  • In: Hopes
  • Comments Off on Kare Anderson: Pull Others Closer and Feel Better Together

These three true stories share a vital trait that can you can adopt to boost your mood — and your value and visibility with others — as an individual and for your organization: “Thief Apologizes And Returns Money To Nashville Market 11 Years Later,” “How Google Maps Led To the Rescue of A Los Angles Stray Dog,” and “Valentine’s Gesture From Dead Husband To Wife Will Make You Melt.”

The common trait? They are uplifting good news stories.

As The Huffington Post has discovered, good news coverage is a gold mine, which would not surprise Contagious author, Jonah Berger, who found that we are most likely to share good news on social networks. The percentage of referral traffic from social channels to The Huffington Post’s Good News section is much greater — almost three times more — than the amount of social referral traffic to their overall website. These stories boost readership, engagement and advertisers’ interest.

And The Huffington Post’s Good News Facebook page already has almost 40,000 followers. As their editorial director of social impact platforms, Riddhi Shah, enthused to me:

We’ve seen a lot of growth in the last two months as we’ve increasingly focused on follower engagement — we ask them questions, ask fans to send us photos, share inspirational quotes, happy facts of the day, etc. We’ve transformed it from just a place for news updates from HuffPost Good News to a destination for sharing stories, insights and quotes that inspire awe — and sometimes spur others to emulate those actions and share them afterwards.

1. Flourish Holding the Three-Faceted Gem of Sharing Good News

Sharing good news generates three nourishing benefits. You boost happiness and inclination towards acting in good will in yourself and in those who see the story, plus you shine in the reflected glow of the story you share. As you make creating and sharing good news sharing a habit, you may move beyond the momentary hedonic highs to a more enduring mood of eudaimonia. Seeing good news on television, for example, lifts one’s mood, according to Michelle Gielan, founder of the Institute for Applied Positive Research, who speculates that watching good news on TV on an ongoing basis can have a more prolonged effect. And I speculate that becoming a champion of good news sharing can make you a magnet, pulling others closer and to bringing out their better side and yours, when around each other.

2. If You Are On the Lookout For Good News, You’ll Find More

Helpfulness counts as good news and is an indelibly credible way for others to learn more about your organization. Keep an eye out for situations where your customers, employees, vendors or others created unexpected moments of happiness for others. They may have discovered how a practice or device in one situation could help yours, provided over-the-top help, responded heroically in a dire situation, or offered a valuable partnership or other opportunity.

“Ah” and “aha”-generating news can come in many forms. For example, Kevin Dutton vividly describes situations in Split-Second Persuasion where someone instinctively and instantly says something or takes action that turns a potentially volatile situation into a moment for collective bonding. People in those situations can’t help sharing how they felt.

3. Make Your Good News Especially Memorable

Get specific sooner. Notice how the HuffPost headlines cited earlier had specifics like Nashville and Valentine? First tell the story, then cite the inherent takeaway lesson that can spur others to emulate the good behavior. Hint: The specific detail proves the general conclusion, not the reverse. That’s why these stories are powerful specificity engines upon which you can speed others’ sharing of your core message memorable.

Tie your engagement-inducing good news sharing to a holiday, specific positive emotion or explicit goal such as spurring camaraderie among your customers, constituency or online community. For example, HuffPost sought to encourage kindness during Thanksgiving, inspire gratitude and help our readers feel closer to each other.

4. Facilitate Bragging Rights: Help Others Look Good When They Participate

Provide multiple ways others can respond and add to the good news. In so doing you are creating what Tell to Win author, Peter Guber, calls a purposeful narrative where others see a role they can play in the story, and add to it as they do. The Huffington Post, for example, makes it easy to comment on the story, and when some comments involve a related story, they sometimes reach out to involve that reader in a separate follow-up column. Plus readers can see what friends of their from other social channels have liked or commented on a story. And, in one click, we can tweet a story we like. Hint: How can you reduce the steps it takes for others to share your good news stories?

What other companion categories of stories make you feel good in sharing? For example, The Huffington Post launched a Third Metric section to cover diverse examples of “redefining success beyond money and power” from “Why Exercise Is a Great Way to Boost Your Bottom Line” to “Why This Banker Quit Wall Street to Become a Monk” and “Improve Your Life by Improving the Lives of Others.” By hosting a conference on the theme they created a further way for people to bond around the topic and “brag” about their favorite stories face to face.

5. Enabling Others to Use Best Talents in Doing Good Is Doubling Happiness

For an inspirational example of an all-volunteer, scalable generator of good news, see ServiceSpace’s KarmaTube, where individuals use technology to take collective action on specific projects for the greater good, and learn from each other so they can adapt those projects to other situations. Like Quantified Self and Shareable the organizational model makes people feel good about participating because they know they are using best talents together on worthy efforts. Such models raise the bar of expectation as we view where we choose to contribute. Mutuality matters.

Just remember, as Edward R. Murrow once said, “We cannot make good news out of bad practice.”

Follow Kare Anderson on Twitter: www.twitter.com/kareanderson

p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif

via Good News on Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kare-anderson/pull-others-closer-and-fe_b_3927557.html

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  • In: Hopes
  • Comments Off on The ‘Miracle’ That Allowed My Dad To Walk Me Down The Aisle

By Victoria Torres for Bridal Guide

Photo Credit: Reflections Creative Photography

May 1, 2013 was just a normal day at work — or so I thought, until I got a phone call from a family member who told me that my father, Walter Schupp, Jr., had suffered a massive stroke and was in critical condition. I was in shock: He’s only 47 years old! I rushed out of work and met him at Lehigh Valley Hospital-Cedar Crest, where he was being transferred. When I saw him, he couldn’t speak, couldn’t move anything on the right side of his body, and was highly cognitively-impaired. I was terrified, and it was difficult for me to even look at him. The doctors took me aside and told me that it didn’t look good, especially since he’d had his stroke over six hours prior to being transferred.

My family and I were left with a very important, life-changing decision. The doctors gave us two choices: Leave him on life support (in which case he would be a vegetable for the rest of his life), or have the doctors perform a highly risky procedure that wasn’t recommended to be done past a certain amount of hours (and he far exceeded those hours). They told us that he may or may not make it out of the procedure alive, and that if he did make it out, they weren’t sure if the procedure would even help.

At that very moment, I felt like I had my father’s life in my hands and I just didn’t know what to do. I knew that he would never want to be a vegetable, yet I was scared that if I said yes to the procedure and he died, that would be on my hands. I would never be able to live with myself. With the help of my grandparents, we decided to give the OK for the procedure and hope for the best. Everything was so rushed that I barely even got a chance to say goodbye to him, and as he was rolled into surgery, I braced myself for the possibility that this could be the very last time we would ever see each other again.

Related: Paralyzed Bride Inspires Us in a Big, Big Way

After hours upon hours of nervous anticipation in the waiting room, the doctor came out and told us that he made it through the procedure — but it was too soon to tell if it had worked. The doctors couldn’t give us many answers or possible outcomes because all stroke patients are different. After coming out of his medically-induced coma, he slowly began to recognize me and other family members. He was still on life support at this time, but he could move his left side a little bit. He still couldn’t move his right side at all, and the doctors said it was highly unlikely that he would ever walk again.

I tried not to talk about my wedding — which was just one month away — while around him because I knew that he would be upset. Before the stroke, he always talked about how excited he was. One day, a family member started talking about my wedding while we were sitting by my father, and a tear trickled down his cheek; he had regained the ability to express emotions again.

Related: Trend We Love: First Look with Dad

After about a week, his breathing tube was removed, and a physical therapist came into the room to see if he could talk or move. Still no luck, but he didn’t give up. A few days later, I got a phone call that he was being transferred to the inpatient head trauma unit at Good Shepherd Rehabilitation. I was so excited, nervous, and hopeful that he may learn how to talk and walk again. It was far from easy, but with the help and guidance from the staff members, he slowly began to say a few words and learned how to walk with a walker just days before my wedding. This was a miracle; he went from nearly dying to walking and talking a little bit in about a month!

I got married on June 8, and I couldn’t have been happier to have my father present and able to walk me down the aisle. Everybody was in shock to see him walking. I believe that my father’s sheer determination to walk me down the aisle — combined with the wonderful support of the rehabilitation team, of course — made it happen.

2013-09-06-walkingwithdad.jpg

At that point, walking was still fairly new to him, and every step made him exhausted. Instead of a father/daughter dance, I told everyone about his story and I sang “Through the Eyes of my Father.” There wasn’t a dry eye in the room. I was just so relieved that he was alive and amazed that he could not only attend my wedding, but also walk me down the aisle.

2013-09-06-singingtodad.jpg

To this day, he is still continuing to improve. He can now walk with a cane, go up and down stairs (with assistance), and has regained a lot of other abilities, including his speech. He’s still getting treatment at the Good Shepherd Allentown outpatient facility, where with the help of the staff, he’s making more and more progress each day.

More from Bridal Guide:

Keep in touch! Check out HuffPost Weddings on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

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p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif

via Good News on Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/16/walk-down-aisle_n_3883037.html

  • In: Hopes
  • Comments Off on The ‘Miracle’ That Allowed My Dad To Walk Me Down The Aisle

By Victoria Torres for Bridal Guide

Photo Credit: Reflections Creative Photography

May 1, 2013 was just a normal day at work — or so I thought, until I got a phone call from a family member who told me that my father, Walter Schupp, Jr., had suffered a massive stroke and was in critical condition. I was in shock: He’s only 47 years old! I rushed out of work and met him at Lehigh Valley Hospital-Cedar Crest, where he was being transferred. When I saw him, he couldn’t speak, couldn’t move anything on the right side of his body, and was highly cognitively-impaired. I was terrified, and it was difficult for me to even look at him. The doctors took me aside and told me that it didn’t look good, especially since he’d had his stroke over six hours prior to being transferred.

My family and I were left with a very important, life-changing decision. The doctors gave us two choices: Leave him on life support (in which case he would be a vegetable for the rest of his life), or have the doctors perform a highly risky procedure that wasn’t recommended to be done past a certain amount of hours (and he far exceeded those hours). They told us that he may or may not make it out of the procedure alive, and that if he did make it out, they weren’t sure if the procedure would even help.

At that very moment, I felt like I had my father’s life in my hands and I just didn’t know what to do. I knew that he would never want to be a vegetable, yet I was scared that if I said yes to the procedure and he died, that would be on my hands. I would never be able to live with myself. With the help of my grandparents, we decided to give the OK for the procedure and hope for the best. Everything was so rushed that I barely even got a chance to say goodbye to him, and as he was rolled into surgery, I braced myself for the possibility that this could be the very last time we would ever see each other again.

Related: Paralyzed Bride Inspires Us in a Big, Big Way

After hours upon hours of nervous anticipation in the waiting room, the doctor came out and told us that he made it through the procedure — but it was too soon to tell if it had worked. The doctors couldn’t give us many answers or possible outcomes because all stroke patients are different. After coming out of his medically-induced coma, he slowly began to recognize me and other family members. He was still on life support at this time, but he could move his left side a little bit. He still couldn’t move his right side at all, and the doctors said it was highly unlikely that he would ever walk again.

I tried not to talk about my wedding — which was just one month away — while around him because I knew that he would be upset. Before the stroke, he always talked about how excited he was. One day, a family member started talking about my wedding while we were sitting by my father, and a tear trickled down his cheek; he had regained the ability to express emotions again.

Related: Trend We Love: First Look with Dad

After about a week, his breathing tube was removed, and a physical therapist came into the room to see if he could talk or move. Still no luck, but he didn’t give up. A few days later, I got a phone call that he was being transferred to the inpatient head trauma unit at Good Shepherd Rehabilitation. I was so excited, nervous, and hopeful that he may learn how to talk and walk again. It was far from easy, but with the help and guidance from the staff members, he slowly began to say a few words and learned how to walk with a walker just days before my wedding. This was a miracle; he went from nearly dying to walking and talking a little bit in about a month!

I got married on June 8, and I couldn’t have been happier to have my father present and able to walk me down the aisle. Everybody was in shock to see him walking. I believe that my father’s sheer determination to walk me down the aisle — combined with the wonderful support of the rehabilitation team, of course — made it happen.

2013-09-06-walkingwithdad.jpg

At that point, walking was still fairly new to him, and every step made him exhausted. Instead of a father/daughter dance, I told everyone about his story and I sang “Through the Eyes of my Father.” There wasn’t a dry eye in the room. I was just so relieved that he was alive and amazed that he could not only attend my wedding, but also walk me down the aisle.

2013-09-06-singingtodad.jpg

To this day, he is still continuing to improve. He can now walk with a cane, go up and down stairs (with assistance), and has regained a lot of other abilities, including his speech. He’s still getting treatment at the Good Shepherd Allentown outpatient facility, where with the help of the staff, he’s making more and more progress each day.

More from Bridal Guide:

Keep in touch! Check out HuffPost Weddings on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

“; var coords = [-5, -72]; // display fb-bubble FloatingPrompt.embed(this, html, undefined, ‘top’, {fp_intersects:1, timeout_remove:2000,ignore_arrow: true, width:236, add_xy:coords, class_name: ‘clear-overlay’}); });
p-89EKCgBk8MZdE.gif

via Good News on Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/16/emotional-wedding_n_3883037.html


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